Mynydd Myddfai

It was just Paul and I today and we chose a walk from the Cicerone publication, “Walking in Carmarthenshire”, which was to lead us onto Mynydd Myddfai.

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Route

We parked at the Myddfai Village Community Hall and Visitor centre. We were too early for a coffee but we should be back well before 1700 when it closes.

The first part of the walk follows the Physicians Trail – a leaflet can be obtained from the centre, although a reprint was awaited – leading to the Physicians Well. From here the walk climbed steadily to the trig point on the summit of Mynydd Myddfai.

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Climbing out of Myddfai

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Pretty

There were some good views of the surrounding countryside including  the Carmarthen Fans, Pen y Fan and Corn Ddu in the Brecon Beacons. The former had some cloud cover but those in the Beacons were clear.

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This way to the Physicians Well

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Carmarthen Fans

We had lunch at the trig point and could see the forecast rain rapidly approaching and so fully kitted out we continued our walk.

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Over tousers? Yes

We thought we could take a short cut down the hill but it led us astray for a short while but we were soon back on track without the necessity of calling out mountain rescue.

The way back to Myddfai was by way of a quiet lane where we celebrated our day with coffee and bara brith.

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Odd sculpture, perils of war?

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Reward

Cilycwm

Another cracking weather day to look forward to and we were off to Cilycwm in the upper Afon Tywi area. Daisy was disappointed as Paul was slumming it in Crickhowell celebrating a birthday.

Route

The “Navigator” did inform us that the chosen route although on the map may not be there on the ground but it was. In addition Carmarthen Council who I frequently grumble about had clearly been investing money installing new gates and waymarks, hooray!

We headed north to climb the unnamed hill near Penfedw Fawr where we had our first coffee break. from there we entered the woodlands of Cwm Rhaeadr and could see in the distance the waterfall which gives its name to the cwm.

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You can just make out the waterfall

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Route 66?

We went a little off piste, talking you see, which meant a climb but well worth it with the views which enfolded.

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Daisy cooling off

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Wood pile porn

We descended down to the Afon Tywi and walked through the campsite in Rhandirmwyn – recommended and then stayed close to the river as walked downstream to Dolachddu. My gadget stopped working here but the route continued along the quiet lane back to the car.

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Pendine Circular

The “Navigator” gave me a limited choice for today’s walk, Laugharne or Pendine, I chose the latter. The forecast looked a little marginal with rain forecast to 0900 then dull with rain again at 1600.

Chris phoned at 0730 with rain pouring down but I gave him short shrift and said the walk was on, especially as I had just made my sandwiches.

We had a full house today including the lovely laid back Daisy and we left for Pendine and found some free parking and set off uphill heading north west and away from the coast.

 

Route ( the gubbins failed to record a short part  back down to Pendine)

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Hard times when single eggs for sale

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Lime Kiln

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Another lime kiln

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Coffee break

The route took us towards and onto Marros Mountain and then south down to the coast at Telpyn Point.

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Still plenty of bluebells about.

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A good grip was welcomed.

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Attractive gate statue

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Looking  east from Telpyn Point

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Looking west from Telpyn Point

We descended to Marros Sands where we spotted our first naturists of the season. We averted our gaze and walked down towards the sea to look for evidence of the petrified forest

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Caves on Marros sands

 

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Petrified stump

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Daisy finding something smelly to rub in.

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Our way forward was now a long slog upwards followed by a steep descent and another steep uphill climb before the never ending Pendine Sands came into view.

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Looking back to one of the steep descents

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Pendine

As forecast, the rain did make some attempt but was just enough to cool us down as we climbed the aforementioned hill but soon petered out. Back in Carmarthen we heard later that there had been thunder and a huge downpour. Luckily for us the Devil looks after us!

 

Ffairfach Circular

The “Navigator” had called this walk “joining the dots” linking well known areas together. It could have been called a stylish walk as we think we crossed some 30 styles!

Route

We parked in the Woodlands Trust carpark in Ffairfach and then headed across the road to walk north along the Afon Tywi to cross the river by the pedestrian footbridge. It’s not clever to jump up and down to make it shake – especially at our age!

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The path leads into Llandeilo town passing the colourful town houses.

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We turned into the lane  into the Dinefwr Estate and we of course left the path and climbed up the steep muddy path and onto the carriage road and then into Penlan Park. Despite visiting Llandeilo on numerous occasion this was first visit to the park. Well worth the diversion as the views are worthwhile.

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Path to the Dinefwr Estate

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On leaving Llandeilo we cracked on soon to be following various footpaths which took us to the Afon Cennen. Trapp and close to the magnificent Carreg Cennen castle.

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My favourite dogs

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Afon Cennen

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Daisy cooling off

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Trapp

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Dog tired

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From her e we headed back to the car via Tregyb Woodland. and the scuplture trail.

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Resembles the “Navigator”?

By the end of the walk rain was threatening but did not arrive until I was safely home.

Amman Valley Cycle Trail

I thought that I would extend the usual ride from Panyffynnon / Brynamman to Cwmllynfell. The additional section is not fully completed as there is a short section of a public footpath from Brynamman alongside the river Nant Garw. It then becomes a traffic free tarmac path to just beyond Cwmllynfell.

Route The gadget didn’t pick up that I returned to the start!

It was sunny all day but a chill in the air with a headwind on the way out, but much faster return trip.

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Afon Amman

 

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For my non Welsh speaking friends!

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I’m not sure either but I sat on one for a coffee break

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The grass is greener —–!

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Bronwydd and Gwili Valley

Free again from the “Navigators” decisions, Paul and I chose another walk from Cicerone’s Walking in Carmarthenshire.

Route

We parked in the car park of the Bronwydd Village Hall and walked upstream along the Afon Gwili. For those who enjoy a spot of white water kayaking/canoeing this is a splendid grade 2 river with one grade 3ish falls.

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Adolph was desperate to capture Bronwydd! 

The guide makes mention of a well placed bench where we turn left and head for the road. We used to have our lunch on that bench after canoeing down river from Cynwyl Elfed. Once over the road the route headed steadily uphill near the chapel and overlooked the Nant Cwmdwyfran valley.

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Paul hoping for draught Felinfoel

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Towards Carmarthen Fans

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We had a break for coffee in the grounds of St Michaels Church in Newchurch a hot bed of those who supported the Rebecca Riots and then headed for a pleasant bridleway climbing up and then down in the Nant Hir Valley.

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Lovingly restored

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I liked the shape

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A nice sign

This led to yet another valley, Nant Tinc and a path leading back to Bronwydd where we passed the Gwili Steam Railway Station before arriving back at the car.

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How do you get the lawn mower up there.

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Beyond restoring?

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An old sheep dip crossing

 

 

Drefach Felindre & Woollen Trail

Paul and I decided on a  walk taken from Cicerone’s “Walking in Carmarthenshire” and was based on Drefach Felindre in the Teifi Valley.

Route

This area was the centre of the Welsh woollen industry during the late 1800s and late 1900s. We started from the National Wool Museum of Wales.

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There are a lot of ruined buildings in the area a lot of them connected to the woollen trade with different trades carried out in them.

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Pant y Bargud

One of the ruins  was being renovated by a chap we came  across who clearly from his seat feeding a roaring wood fire was in no hurry to finish his project. The original house belonged to a seamstress, but now all that was visible were a number of walls. There is no electric, water or other facilities but the new owner was confident he could live off grid.

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The woods were starting to show signs of bluebells and other spring plants.We walked through the small hamlets of Cwmhiraeth, Cwmpengraig and Penboyr where lunch was had in the grounds of the austere chapel.

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Odd shaped farm building

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Soar Chapel Cwmpengraig

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Penboyr Chapel

On a path running through woodland above the Bargoed valley was a path known as the Coffin Trail. Carrying the deceased along this path must have been hard work but some early entrepreneur opened a pub along the path known as Swigod Arms (Blue Tit Arms) which sadly closed 100 years ago and just a ruin exists now.

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Blue Tit Pub

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Glamping?

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A real wood conversion

The last hamlet we passed near was Drefelin (Milltown) once known as the Huddersfield of Wales

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Check your brakes

The walk finished back in the museum where a welcome coffee (but no cake) was had.

Porthyrhyd (Llandovery) Circular

Sunday’s chat with “The Navigator” told me that Monday’s walk would be centred on Porthyrhyd, but not the one a mile from my home but the one near Llandovery.

When I left home the weather was cold and foggy but the mist lifted but although dry the weather was not ideal for photographs.

Route

The walk would take in quiet lanes, footpaths and some of the old drover roads  which cross the area.

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Drovers road

Not far from the start we came across a renovated cottage where we had a chat with the American or was she Canadian owner who with her husband had spent a long time bringing the cottage back to life. I particularly liked the hand rail on the outside wall.

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A sense of humour

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Carmarthen Fans in the misty distance

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Unnamed Church

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Nature reclaiming machinery

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Caio – not CA 10 as someone pronounced it!

This being spring we saw lots of sheep with their lambs and one odd ewe who sounded a lot like a duck – strange.

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Kidwelly to North Dock Llanelli and back

A 25 mile bike ride which started in Kidwelly and followed route 4 taking in the newly installed section which is the altered route from the previous section through Pembrey Forest.

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Smooth!

I kept to the route which runs roughly parallel to the Millennium Path until joining that path near the Pavilion cafe .

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She landed here as the Pavilion cafe serves good coffee and egg on toast

I continued on to North Dock and stopped for a break.

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My return route kept to the Millennium Path and into Pembrey Park and then back to Kidwelly.

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We could have done with him against England.

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Llanboidy

With The Navigator topping up his tan in some far flung land, Paul and I chose a walk from the recent  Cicerone publication about walks in Carmarthenshire and headed for Llanboidy.

This was the first windscreen scraping day of winter with a heavy grass frost on the fields which disappeared  as the day went on.

Route

We parked in the public car park (free) in the village close to the long closed Maesgwynne Arms and headed across the fields to start our walk. There is an interesting story of W R H Powell who owned the Maesgwynne Estate – read the link.

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Llanboidy village and Maesgwynne Arms

Llanboidy village and Maesgwynne Arms

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We joined a quiet lane which double backed on our outward journey and then south along a footpath leading to a ford at Felin Isaf, a remote property which we imagined would be somewhat cold and damp in this weather without a roaring fire.

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We stopped near here for a coffee before heading uphill on a leaf strewn path to Dyffryn Marlais and came across a small herd of bullocks up to their knees munching on fresh hay. They seemed contented.

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Another lane walk took us west and then north to Crosshands where we joined another footpath, part of the Landsker Trail, back to Llanboidy. On this part of the walk we came across a crop of miscanthus and a small woodland which seemed to be some kind of memorial gardens.

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Llanboidy Church

Llanboidy Church